Treatment Protocol

Self Hypnosis

Hypnosis, or hypnotherapy, is not always the first thing that people think of in the treatment of addictions, yet it very definitely has a role to play, particularly in long term success. Substance abuse, whether relating to alcohol, prescription drugs, or illegal substances, is notoriously difficult to work with. This can be because it’s often not the addict who wants to stop, but the people who care about the addict. It has long been recognised and accepted by support groups and clinics that unless the addict themselves has reached a point where they genuinely want to take control of their life and stop using whatever substance they’ve been abusing, then the chances of success, with or without the use of hypnosis, are slim.
However, as soon as the addict comes to a decision that they genuinely want to stop, the whole picture changes and a great deal of help can effectively be put in place, mainly because there’s a far better chance of the addict reaching out and accepting that help. At this point, hypnosis can be a very effective tool that can be used to support them.
While it’s generally only offered once the person has already physically cleared their system of the addictive substance, hypnosis can sometimes help to cope with the uncomfortable side effects of withdrawal. Mostly however, it’s used as a tool to help the recovering addict to break habits, stay motivated and remain substance free long term

Hypnosis, or hypnotherapy, is not always the first thing that people think of in the treatment of addictions, yet it very definitely has a role to play, particularly in long term success. Substance abuse, whether relating to alcohol, prescription drugs, or illegal substances, is notoriously difficult to work with. This can be because it’s often not the addict who wants to stop, but the people who care about the addict. It has long been recognised and accepted by support groups and clinics that unless the addict themselves has reached a point where they genuinely want to take control of their life and stop using whatever substance they’ve been abusing, then the chances of success, with or without the use of hypnosis, are slim.

However, as soon as the addict comes to a decision that they genuinely want to stop, the whole picture changes and a great deal of help can effectively be put in place, mainly because there’s a far better chance of the addict reaching out and accepting that help. At this point, hypnosis can be a very effective tool that can be used to support them.

While it’s generally only offered once the person has already physically cleared their system of the addictive substance, hypnosis can sometimes help to cope with the uncomfortable side effects of withdrawal. Mostly however, it’s used as a tool to help the recovering addict to break habits, stay motivated and remain substance free long term

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